Hatred Of Men, Suspicion Of Boys

To be honest, I strongly considered not publishing this essay. Mainly because of feared personal cost. In fact, I’ve sat on this subject and have kept my feelings to myself for about a year for precisely this reason, until eventually I just came to a point where I thought the problem was getting so bad something had to be said. It wasn’t just that no one was speaking up for men, it was that no one thought men needed speaking up for.

Read More

The Case For A Warren Presidency

Unlike in 2016, where only one progressive choice mounted a serious challenge to the party establishment, this upcoming primary will also see plenty of leftwing mavericks. Tulsi Gabbard, an Iraq War veteran who supports a non-interventionist foreign policy; Andrew Yang, the Venture for America entrepreneur running on a platform of universal basic income; and Bernie Sanders, 2016’s one progressive, who ignited a movement of young people across the country around the issues of free college, raising the minimum wage to a living wage, and Medicare For All. Yet if you want a real reformer who is also the most likely among the progressive bunch to become president, I would argue to look no further than Elizabeth Warren.

Read More

Bottom Lines Matter (Dispatches from a Dying Democracy, Part III)

It is not a surprise that tellings of stories— and even tellings of true stories— about slavery before and during the Civil War diverge on the question of whether racism is an evolved aspect of human nature which we need to be constantly vigilant against, or if racism is powered by more recent economic drivers. But regardless of how one feels about the origins of race and racism themselves, it’s hard to ignore how the economic engine which for so long drove literal slavery continues today to drive slavery of a more subtle nature. This “subtle slavery” impacts all of the working class now and not just African-Americans.

Read More

Democratize Social Media (Dispatches from a Dying Democracy, Part II)

If the impact of social media advertising and censorship are a concern, then—the thinking goes— why not turn major platforms into public utilities like PBS and NPR, where the government can’t have a relationship with advertisers and where speech is protected by the First Amendment? But while this idea on the surface sounds incredibly appealing, I can’t help but shake the suspicion of “good in theory/monstrous in practice.” In light of the fact that the United States has become a post-9/11 surveillance state, both by means of the Patriot Act and through NSA spying, it seems a tad naive to entrust this same state to somehow be the protector of our dignity and privacy online. Far better, I submit—and far more ambitious, perhaps— to turn major platforms like Facebook and Twitter into the world’s largest cooperatives.

Read More

Eros: An Obituary (Dispatches from a Dying Democracy, Part I)

Capitalism drives all human interaction away from affection toward profit motive. In the age of dating apps which function as virtual “people stores”, consumer mentality has caused individuals to be commodified into “personality packages” meant for consuming and discarding upon whim (ultimately leading to feelings of dissatisfaction for the user and the used); and in this sense radical egalitarians, within feminism and wider leftism, who seek to bring about the end of romantic love find within the monstrous economic system a strange bedfellow.

Read More