Hatred Of Men, Suspicion Of Boys

To be honest, I strongly considered not publishing this essay. Mainly because of feared personal cost. In fact, I’ve sat on this subject and have kept my feelings to myself for about a year for precisely this reason, until eventually I just came to a point where I thought the problem was getting so bad something had to be said. It wasn’t just that no one was speaking up for men, it was that no one thought men needed speaking up for.

Read More

The Case For A Warren Presidency

Unlike in 2016, where only one progressive choice mounted a serious challenge to the party establishment, this upcoming primary will also see plenty of leftwing mavericks. Tulsi Gabbard, an Iraq War veteran who supports a non-interventionist foreign policy; Andrew Yang, the Venture for America entrepreneur running on a platform of universal basic income; and Bernie Sanders, 2016’s one progressive, who ignited a movement of young people across the country around the issues of free college, raising the minimum wage to a living wage, and Medicare For All. Yet if you want a real reformer who is also the most likely among the progressive bunch to become president, I would argue to look no further than Elizabeth Warren.

Read More

Bottom Lines Matter (Dispatches from a Dying Democracy, Part III)

It is not a surprise that tellings of stories— and even tellings of true stories— about slavery before and during the Civil War diverge on the question of whether racism is an evolved aspect of human nature which we need to be constantly vigilant against, or if racism is powered by more recent economic drivers. But regardless of how one feels about the origins of race and racism themselves, it’s hard to ignore how the economic engine which for so long drove literal slavery continues today to drive slavery of a more subtle nature. This “subtle slavery” impacts all of the working class now and not just African-Americans.

Read More